Coiffures hair in nineteenth-century french literature and culture

2020-04-04 09:47

Coiffures: Hair in NineteenthCentury French Literature and Culture. Newark: University of Delaware Press, 2010, Pp. 297. ISBN Susan Hiner, Vassar College Carol Rifeljs new book on hair is a refreshing addition to a growing body of scholarship in the eld of French fashion studies.Coiffures describes the historical and cultural practices associated with women's hairstyles, hair care, and hair art in nineteenthcentury France. Hair also has profound symbolic significance. Lying on the border between life and death, it grows, but does not feel. coiffures hair in nineteenth-century french literature and culture

The book weaves together the multiple valences of hair as symbol, as key signifier in nineteenthcentury realist novels, and as physical embodiment of woman. The book is organized into five chapters following a brief introduction outlining the prominence of hair both in novelistic discourse and in other cultural media, such as fashion illustrations and treatises on beauty.

How can the answer be improved? Coiffures: hair in nineteenthcentury French literature and culture. [Carol de Dobay Rifelj Balzac claimed that toilettes were the expression of society. Coiffures describes the historical and cultural practices associated with women's hairstyles, hair care, and hair art incoiffures hair in nineteenth-century french literature and culture Coiffures: Hair in Nineteenthcentury French Literature and Culture. In the literary portraits that often present characters, hair may indicate social characteristics like class, age, attractiveness, fashion sense, propriety, or impropriety. Or it may convey personality, particularly for writers influenced by the pseudoscience of physiognomy.

Rating: 4.73 / Views: 839

Coiffures hair in nineteenth-century french literature and culture free

Examines nineteenthcentury hairstyles and their cultural associations, and analyzes the social and symbolic roles that hair played in literary representations of the new body ideal of the era in fashion magazines, and as clues to social status, sexual availability and character in the fiction of major French authors including Baudelaire, Balzac, Flaubert, and Zola. coiffures hair in nineteenth-century french literature and culture